Charmides reading: the Third Definition of Sophrosyne

NOTE: This is the 8th of a series of posts and discussions of Plato’s dialogue Charmides. To view previous posts, go to the main blog page and scroll down from there. Please feel free to add comments, questions, corrections, etc.

In an earlier post, I posted recordings of talks (each about twenty minutes in length) on Charmides’ definitions of sophrosyne. I just recorded the third of these talks.

To listen to my discussion of the third definitionclick on this link. Here Charmides defines sophrosyne as “doing one’s own things” or “minding one’s own business”.

In case you missed the earlier talks:

To listen to my discussion of the first definition, click on this link. Here Charmides defines sophrosyne as “a certain quietness”.

To listen to my discussion of the second definition, click on this link. Here Charmides defines sophrosyne as “bashfulness.”

My sense is that there is something present in the voice that is not present in text and I am hoping that, by providing audio, something can be added that is lost in written text. But I will let you adjudicate whether this is helpful or annoying. Please comment and let me know either way. I can put up transcripts later if you are having problems with these.

Please also feel free to comment on the content of this audio.

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3 thoughts on “Charmides reading: the Third Definition of Sophrosyne

  1. Woody, I appreciate the audio recordings. Certain topics seem better suited for voice, others for a textual reading, and others for a tactile learning. I have always found that poetry is best when expressed out loud, even if I quietly mouth the words while reading the lines. There is some unique connection that speaking poetry has that is stronger than solely reading the words. Please continue to use a variety of ways to converse with us on your blog.

  2. Woody, I skimmed these articles a while back and thought they were very interesting – now I’m reading the Charmides for a class and decided to go back through them in more depth and found that the audio-links you’ve got here aren’t good any longer. Any chance you could put them up again?

    Thank you, I find your writing on Plato extremely clear.
    -Will

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